Huntsville Area Boosters Raise Funds to Preserve Land Formerly Used as a Monastery | News, Sports, Jobs


Photo provided, Summit Land Conservancy

The grounds of the former Abbey of Our Lady of the Holy Trinity Monastery southeast of Huntsville are pictured in this undated photo. Officials said on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 that the necessary funds had been raised to place the site of the former monastery in bondage, thus preserving the land.

HUNTSVILLE – As more houses appear in the Ogden Valley, at least a large expanse of undeveloped land will remain pristine and devoid of new subdivision.

The contingent struggling to retain part of the land that previously housed a Trappist monastery received the last major injection of funding needed to move forward with plans to place the property southeast of Huntsville in an easement. conservation.

“It’s super exciting,” said Cheryl Fox, executive director of Summit land conservation, in collaboration with the Ogden Valley Land Trust on the initiative. “It has been truly magnificent, (there has been) a great wave of citizen support for this iconic property.

A federal grant of $ 8.8 million from the Natural Resources Conservation ServiceThe Agricultural Conservation Easement Program provided most of the funding needed to secure the easement. Plan boosters needed an additional $ 300,000 in donations on top of that, and Weber County commissioners provided $ 50,000 on Tuesday, the last major injection of funding needed.

When all stages are completed, farming will be permitted on the 1,080-acre parcel formerly used by the Abbey of Notre-Dame de la Sainte-Trinit̩. However, development Рwhich is gaining momentum in the Ogden Valley, like all along the Wasatch front Рwill not be allowed, which is the idea.

Photo provided, Summit Land Conservancy

The grounds of the former Abbey of Our Lady of the Holy Trinity Monastery southeast of Huntsville are pictured in this undated photo. Officials said on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 that the necessary funds had been raised to place the site of the former monastery in bondage, thus preserving the land.

“The story of the Ogden Valley is all about agriculture and open spaces,” said Weber County Commissioner Gage Froerer, who lives in the area. “It keeps the easement so that someone cannot put 300 or 400 houses in it. “

The current owners of the 1,080 acre land, Bill White and Wynstonn Wangsgard, will retain the land. But the conservation easement, which will be held by Summit Land Conservancy, will prohibit all residential, commercial and other development. Hay cultivation and cattle grazing – permitted – will continue.

The monastery, established in 1947, closed in 2017 due to declining interest in this way of life. Given the high demand for housing, Fox said the developers have expressed interest in acquiring the land from the Roman Catholic Church, the owner, for housing estates and other developments. “We knew then that talks were taking place,” she said.

White and Wangsgard, instead, acquired the land in hopes of preserving it in its natural state, which led to the grant of the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program. Much of the local grant and matching funds will go to them, but Fox said the owners could not benefit in the long term given the investment they have made in the land.

The monks who once ruled the land “were active farmers, ranchers and beekeepers who used agricultural production as a form of prayer and devotion,” according to the Summit Land Trust. Those who were still living there when the facility closed moved to a retirement home in Salt Lake City.

Photo provided, Summit Land Conservancy

The grounds of the former Abbey of Our Lady of the Holy Trinity Monastery southeast of Huntsville are pictured in this undated photo. Officials said on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 that the necessary funds had been raised to place the site of the former monastery in bondage, thus preserving the land.

Elk regularly cross the land, according to Fox. “The birds are amazing there,” she said. In addition, the earth in its natural state has environmental benefits, serving as a sort of filter for air and water and sequestering carbon.

Gail Meakins, president of the Ogden Valley Land Trust, said the public has really stepped forward, pledging to generate the $ 300,000 needed on top of the $ 8.8 million grant. “I think it shows that there is an interest in saving open spaces and farmland,” she said.

Bulletin

Join the thousands of people who already receive our daily newsletter.

About Joyce Hill

Check Also

New commercial building with restaurants planned for Ogden Corridor

A four-tenant commercial building is slated for construction on land located in Naperville’s commercial corridor …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.